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An Inconvenient Truth

November 27th, 2006

So the makers of An Inconvenient Truth offered 50,000 free copies of the DVD to the National Science Teachers Association for free use in their classrooms. The association turned them down. And it’s looking suspiciously like they did it at least in part because they didn’t want to place “unnecessary risk upon the [NSTA] capital campaign, especially certain targeted supporters.” One of whom, apparently, is Exxon-Mobil.

http://consciousearth.blogspot.com/2006/11/inconvenient-truth-squeezed-from.html

Grrrrrr……

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  1. November 27th, 2006 at 22:56 | #1

    In looking at their web site, I can understand why they don’t want to rock their boat.

    http://www.nsta.org/mspfunding

    If I’m reading this correctly…
    In 2005 they asked for 269 million dollars in appropriations as part of the No Child Left Behind act. In response, Bush wanted to combine them with other similar organizations and let them duke it out over the money budgeted. They were only willing to do that when they offered 0 in the budget as an option and faced

    I can only imagine what transpired in 2006, and they probably are drawing a hefty sum from outside benefactors.

    While I think it’s absurd for them to choose sides, when you consider the things that budget spending is geared toward, which, until this war is over will be on the military and less and less towards education, I don’t know if I can blame educational organizations for having to make choices like they did when they know the government cares less about providing proper educational resources and more about dropping bombs.

    I saw where people were talking about going to the NSTA site and letting them know they disapprove of their decision. It takes more than that, and until the government gets its head on straight as to the fact that they’re first responsibility is supposed to be the people of THIS country instead of spending billions blowing up people in other countries, the blame really needs to aim right there.

    I wonder if someone approached Exxon-Mobil as to whether or not they would pull their funding if the NSTA were to accept the DVDs and distribute them, if they’d be so bold as to openly state that they would, or if they’d take the proper PR tact and state they would not.

    • November 28th, 2006 at 02:32 | #2

      I wonder if such a conversation has already taken place – between the NSTA and Exxon-Mobil. Also, I don’t know that I’d believe a PR statement saying that they wouldn’t. Companies frequently make a very public statement in one direction, then much later and with no fanfare, move in the opposite direction.

      I don’t fault the NSTA for wanting and needing the money. I’m just dismayed that this is the way the world works.

      • November 28th, 2006 at 15:42 | #3

        After everything I’ve heard about Haliburton and the level of profiteering from this war, anything else just seems normal.

        Doesn’t make it right, certainly doesn’t make it moral – and I’m sure it will eventually come back to bite them in the hiney.

  2. November 27th, 2006 at 22:56 | #4

    In looking at their web site, I can understand why they don’t want to rock their boat.

    http://www.nsta.org/mspfunding

    If I’m reading this correctly…
    In 2005 they asked for 269 million dollars in appropriations as part of the No Child Left Behind act. In response, Bush wanted to combine them with other similar organizations and let them duke it out over the money budgeted. They were only willing to do that when they offered 0 in the budget as an option and faced

    I can only imagine what transpired in 2006, and they probably are drawing a hefty sum from outside benefactors.

    While I think it’s absurd for them to choose sides, when you consider the things that budget spending is geared toward, which, until this war is over will be on the military and less and less towards education, I don’t know if I can blame educational organizations for having to make choices like they did when they know the government cares less about providing proper educational resources and more about dropping bombs.

    I saw where people were talking about going to the NSTA site and letting them know they disapprove of their decision. It takes more than that, and until the government gets its head on straight as to the fact that they’re first responsibility is supposed to be the people of THIS country instead of spending billions blowing up people in other countries, the blame really needs to aim right there.

    I wonder if someone approached Exxon-Mobil as to whether or not they would pull their funding if the NSTA were to accept the DVDs and distribute them, if they’d be so bold as to openly state that they would, or if they’d take the proper PR tact and state they would not.

    • November 28th, 2006 at 02:32 | #5

      I wonder if such a conversation has already taken place – between the NSTA and Exxon-Mobil. Also, I don’t know that I’d believe a PR statement saying that they wouldn’t. Companies frequently make a very public statement in one direction, then much later and with no fanfare, move in the opposite direction.

      I don’t fault the NSTA for wanting and needing the money. I’m just dismayed that this is the way the world works.

      • November 28th, 2006 at 15:42 | #6

        After everything I’ve heard about Haliburton and the level of profiteering from this war, anything else just seems normal.

        Doesn’t make it right, certainly doesn’t make it moral – and I’m sure it will eventually come back to bite them in the hiney.

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